LondonNet News Headlines
21/06/00
Chicken Runs Into Accent Trouble
- Battery of dialogue problems for Wallace and Gromit

CHICKEN RUN - the first full-length feature by Wallace and Gromit creator Nick Park - looks set to crack America when it opens this week - despite language difficulties posed by the film's London and Yorkshire dialects.

Based on the war epic, The Great Escape, Parks' UKP25 million animated adventure, which uses the vocal talents of Mel Gibson and Julia Sawalha among others, relates the tale of chickens trying to escape from a battery farm in Yorkshire.

US audiences, however, are likely to be baffled by Cockney and Yorkshire jargon such as 'nelly-podging', 'well-chuffed' and 'chocks away'. But, despite being linguistically challenging, the film will no doubt win the hearts of young and old as the chickens hatch a plan to escape a fate of being turned into chicken pies.

Spokesman Jeffrey Katzenberg voiced concern over the broad accents but said that brilliant characterisation made the film a success. He pointed to one particular scene where evil farm owner Mrs Tweedy berated her husband when the pie-making machine packs up to which the hapless farmer replies, "I didn't do owt."

"I loved the scene but I literally couldn't understand one line of dialogue," Katzberg admitted.

Four-years in the making, Chicken Run now looks set to be the most popular British movie on the other side of the pond since The Full Monty, some dialogue of which had to sub-titled in the US. Chicken Run opens in the UK on June 30.




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